Liliaeth (liliaeth) wrote,
Liliaeth
liliaeth

My answer to a Question Tom Breevoort posed in his blog over at marvel.com

I really did intend to do some more Reader Mail today, but something else came up that's sent my mind spinning in another direction. Over on John Byrne's message board, there's a thread going on asking when each board-member's perception of comics changed, and they realized that these were stories being created by fallible human beings, rather than omnipotent machines.

In other words, when did you first peer behind the curtain?

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<i>I really did intend to do some more Reader Mail today, but something else came up that's sent my mind spinning in another direction. Over on John Byrne's message board, there's a thread going on asking when each board-member's perception of comics changed, and they realized that these were stories being created by fallible human beings, rather than omnipotent machines.

In other words, when did you first peer behind the curtain?

<a href:"http://marvel.com/blogs/Tom_Brevoort/entry/1014">Tom Breevoort</a></i>


For me it was a Belgian comic called Suske en Wiske, I know there's an english version, but I'm not sure what it's called.

Anyway, the series was about a selection of characters, Suske and Wiske, two perpetual teenagers and the heroes of the book, Aunt Sidonia, a tall, very thin waiflike figure with a really big nose, Lambik, a very arrogant, character who saw himself as the hero, Professor Barabas the resident genius that caused most of the adventures and Jerommeke, probably the only 'superhero' in the group

The issue in question that got me to stop reading the series for about ten years afterwards, was called 'de briesende bruid' which translates I think to 'the really anxious bride', though I'm probably wrong on that, couldn't find the right translation, sorry.

Anyway, for decades Sidonia had been after Lambik to get him to marry her, and in this issue, she finally gave up on that quest, fell in love with another man and got married only... in a move equal to Quesada, the writer then intervened right on the scene, and had the artist draw a hand erasing the scene.

We even got a note in the issue, I think at the end where the writer, who was new on the series, if I well remember, made it clear that part of the arrangement they had with the original writer and creator of the characters, was that the characters were never allowed to change, and that Sidonia was never allowed to marry.

And I remember thinking, then why the hell am I reading this book? I threw that thing down in disgust, left it to my brother to mess it up, (he still liked drawing in my strips at the time) and stopped reading the series.

Because even then, at age 12 or so, could be wrong, it's been a while, I just didn't want to read about characters that are never allowed to change, about characters stuck in their youth, because for some reason their creators are incapable of seeing beyond that one aspect of the character.

I realized since than that the book had more flaws than that, but that was the moment I just saw through it all and lost interest. It's also about around the time that I moved over to American comics like Spider-Man, because unlike Suske and Wiske, Peter Parker was allowed to grow and change, because he wasn't stuck in perpetual youth and because he was married.
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